Nature Wants to Eat You
This is a hookworm. According to the CDC, between 576 and 740 million people have this little hell-bastard writhing around in their guts.
Photos: AJC1
(And here’s a great piece on how the hookworm shaped the economics of the southern US)

This is a hookworm. According to the CDC, between 576 and 740 million people have this little hell-bastard writhing around in their guts.

Photos: AJC1

(And here’s a great piece on how the hookworm shaped the economics of the southern US)

Ah Dunkleosteus - because why have teeth, when your entire skull  could be made of massive armoured machetes. It was 33 feet long, could  exert 8,000 pounds per square inch at the tip of each “fang”, and it could open its jaws in a fiftieth of a second to suck prey in. 
It is also long, long extinct which is the only reason you are not currently crying in a corner, begging for mercy.

Ah Dunkleosteus - because why have teeth, when your entire skull could be made of massive armoured machetes. It was 33 feet long, could exert 8,000 pounds per square inch at the tip of each “fang”, and it could open its jaws in a fiftieth of a second to suck prey in. 

It is also long, long extinct which is the only reason you are not currently crying in a corner, begging for mercy.

The lamprey has no jaws, but the lamprey needs no jaws. It uses this sucker to latch on to the bodies of other fish, rasp away at their flesh, and drink their blood.
So why then would you allow someone to do this to you?

The lamprey has no jaws, but the lamprey needs no jaws. It uses this sucker to latch on to the bodies of other fish, rasp away at their flesh, and drink their blood.

So why then would you allow someone to do this to you?

The moray eel has a second set of jaws in its throat that can launch  forwards, like Giger’s Alien. It bites prey with the first set, and  pulls them in with the second.
(More here)

The moray eel has a second set of jaws in its throat that can launch forwards, like Giger’s Alien. It bites prey with the first set, and pulls them in with the second.

(More here)

The trapjaw ant: its jaws can open at 180 degrees, and snap shut at  between 78 and 140 miles per hour. That’s the world’s fastest bite.
Source: Alex Wild

The trapjaw ant: its jaws can open at 180 degrees, and snap shut at between 78 and 140 miles per hour. That’s the world’s fastest bite.

Source: Alex Wild

The leatherback turtle eats your soul jellyfish and the backward-pointing spines in its mouth help to keep its prey from slipping out. They go all the way down its gullet.

Image sources: TYKIWDBI and NOAA