Nature Wants to Eat You
Two things make spitting cobras more terrifying than your average venomous snake. The first is obvious: they have projectile weapons. The second is less so: they can see into the future.
There are around a dozen species of spitting cobra, and all of them “spit” by squirting venom through small holes in the front of their fangs. Their venom can blind, and the cobras aim for the eyes. They wait until their target makes a jerky movement of their head, predict its position 200 milliseconds later and shoot at where their eyes are going to be.
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Two things make spitting cobras more terrifying than your average venomous snake. The first is obvious: they have projectile weapons. The second is less so: they can see into the future.

There are around a dozen species of spitting cobra, and all of them “spit” by squirting venom through small holes in the front of their fangs. Their venom can blind, and the cobras aim for the eyes. They wait until their target makes a jerky movement of their head, predict its position 200 milliseconds later and shoot at where their eyes are going to be.

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The gelada has two threat displays: it raises its eyebrows to display the pink skin underneath, and it pulls its lip over its face to turn itself into a terrifying long-toothed demon.

Yeah, I’d lead with the lip thing, mate. 

Geladas are very odd monkeys. Close relatives of baboons, they live only in Ethiopian mountains, they’re covered in shaggy yellow hair, and they’re the only monkey that primarily eats grass. They are like a cross between a cow, Animal from the Muppets, and your nightmares.

Image sources: Arkive and Scenicreflections

The goblin shark can transform from a terrifying fish into a really terrifying fish that’s suddenly a lot closer to you. Its jaws can shoot forwards (the money shot in the video above is at 00:35). Combined with the unusually long snout, and you can see where it gets the name from.

These terrifying chompers belong to a rather cuddly-looking worm called Lepidonotopodium, that lives in hot deep-sea vents off the western coast of Canada. It fees on hope bacteria and other microbes.
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These terrifying chompers belong to a rather cuddly-looking worm called Lepidonotopodium, that lives in hot deep-sea vents off the western coast of Canada. It fees on hope bacteria and other microbes.

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We’re gonna need a bigger boat. And some guns. Lots of guns.

This is the goliath tigerfish. It can grow up to 5 feet in length and is found in the Congo river system. If you happen to be swimming there without a suit of armour, try and stay away from the stabby bits.

The antlion loves ants. It loves them so much that it digs a slippery, conical deathpit house of fun, just for them. Sweet! Ants that stray into it slip downwards; if they manage to get a foothold, the antlion flicks sand at them so they lose their grip because it’s excited. Fun! When they reach the bottom, the antlion bites hugs them with its massive jaws and injects them with paralysing venom love. Awww!
Sources: Cotinis via Bugguide

The antlion loves ants. It loves them so much that it digs a slippery, conical deathpit house of fun, just for them. Sweet! Ants that stray into it slip downwards; if they manage to get a foothold, the antlion flicks sand at them so they lose their grip because it’s excited. Fun! When they reach the bottom, the antlion bites hugs them with its massive jaws and injects them with paralysing venom love. Awww!

Sources: Cotinis via Bugguide

The black mamba is actually a light grey, so why is it called the bla… OH GOD CLOSE THE MOUTH CLOSE THE MOUTH.
Yes, the inside of its mouth is black. It’s like staring into the abyss. Other than that, its aggressive temperament, its potent venom, the fact that it’s one of the world’s fastest snakes, and its ability to lift the front third of its body off the ground so it’s basically staring you in the eye, it’s not that scary. Think of it as a long kitten.

The black mamba is actually a light grey, so why is it called the bla… OH GOD CLOSE THE MOUTH CLOSE THE MOUTH.

Yes, the inside of its mouth is black. It’s like staring into the abyss. Other than that, its aggressive temperament, its potent venom, the fact that it’s one of the world’s fastest snakes, and its ability to lift the front third of its body off the ground so it’s basically staring you in the eye, it’s not that scary. Think of it as a long kitten.

Several years ago, I would have said that the Komodo dragon’s bite was lethal because the bacteria in its filthy mouth cause blood poisoning. Now, we know that the dragon is also venomous. Its jaws are weak but its neck is strong. It’s adapted to inflict gaping wounds by biting lightly and tearing ferociously. Then, if your day wasn’t going badly enough, it drools venom inside.
Find out more here.
Image source

Several years ago, I would have said that the Komodo dragon’s bite was lethal because the bacteria in its filthy mouth cause blood poisoning. Now, we know that the dragon is also venomous. Its jaws are weak but its neck is strong. It’s adapted to inflict gaping wounds by biting lightly and tearing ferociously. Then, if your day wasn’t going badly enough, it drools venom inside.

Find out more here.

Image source

Good advice above. The pointy end belongs to the viperfish, whose teeth are so long that they have to curve around its face when it closes its mouth. Fishbase says that its “harmless” to humans, which is exactly what the viperfish wants you to think.
Source: Pacificoceanworks

Good advice above. The pointy end belongs to the viperfish, whose teeth are so long that they have to curve around its face when it closes its mouth. Fishbase says that its “harmless” to humans, which is exactly what the viperfish wants you to think.

Source: Pacificoceanworks

This is a hookworm. According to the CDC, between 576 and 740 million people have this little hell-bastard writhing around in their guts.
Photos: AJC1
(And here’s a great piece on how the hookworm shaped the economics of the southern US)

This is a hookworm. According to the CDC, between 576 and 740 million people have this little hell-bastard writhing around in their guts.

Photos: AJC1

(And here’s a great piece on how the hookworm shaped the economics of the southern US)